Savannah's Mayor Honor's Labor Unions

Mayor of Savannah GA forms Working Savannah partnership with Savannah Regional Central Labor Council (SRCLC) and issues Proclamation recognizing Labor's contributions.   Accepting the Proclamation is SRCLC President Christi Hulme. 

The proclamation recognizes September 3rd through September 10th, 2020 as "Labor Week"

President Hulme was also announced as Chair of Working Savannah - the partnership between the Savannah Regional CLC and the City of Savannah.

Mayor Van Johnson said, "It makes so much sense for the City of Savannah to have a strong partnership with our Labor community. And I promised this.  And since they are already very well organized, we will call this partnership with the Savannah Regional Central Labor Council - "Working Savannah".   Where we will work together to ensure better work, better pay and benefit opportunities for Savannahians through apprenticeships and job training programs that these affiliates already do so well."

President Christi Hulme stated, "On behalf of all local unions in the Savannah area, I want to thank you, Mayor Johnson and City Council for this great honor.  Recognizing the struggles and accomplishments labor unions have made which benefits all workers and the community is a tremendous statement."

To see the video visit https://youtu.be/bjYkeDszUSE

The AFL-CIO Executive Council today elected Liz Shuler, a visionary leader and longtime trade unionist, to serve as president of the federation of 56 unions and 12.5 million members. Shuler is the first woman to hold the office in the history of the labor federation. The Executive Council also elected United Steelworkers (USW) International Vice President Fred Redmond to succeed Shuler as secretary-treasurer, the first African American to hold the number two office. Tefere Gebre will continue as executive vice president, rounding out the most diverse team of officers ever to lead the AFL-CIO.

Our brother and leader Richard Trumka passed away on August 5, 2021, at the age of 72.

The first woman to lead the biggest U.S. labor federation wants even more women as decision-makers in a labor movement that is becoming less male and less white.

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Liz Shuler, the newly elected president of the AFL-CIO, about her goals for the organization and the future of the labor movement.

Listen to the segment on NPR.

Newly elected AFL-CIO President Liz Shuler discusses the future of the labor movement.

Watch the segment on Bloomberg.

On the morning of August 5, the nation, the American labor movement, and workers across the globe were rocked by the sudden, unexpected loss of a great man, an incredible leader, and a lifetime fighter for justice, AFL-CIO President Richard Louis Trumka, or “it’s just Rich” as he would so often correct anyone opting for the more formal greeting. 

In April 2020, after the labor market took its largest one-month hit in modern history, Black men and women suffered job losses proportionate to those of white women. Still, their losses were far less severe than those of Hispanic men and women. Black workers already had higher unemployment rates, as has always been the case, but their unemployment rates did not skyrocket as much as other groups.

The nation watched earlier this year as heroic warehouse workers at the Amazon facility in Bessemer, Alabama, made history.

Despite intense pressure, intimidation and bullying by one of the largest corporations in the world, they fought to reclaim their fair share of power and form a union. They spoke out about an experience familiar to so many working people—the stress of being overworked, underpaid, and afraid for the future.

This week, the AFL-CIO is leading a PRO Act Week of Action, part of the labor movement’s national campaign urging senators to pass this transformative labor law reform. This week of action includes at least one event near every U.S. senator’s office.

In April 2020, after the labor market took its largest one-month hit in modern history, Black men and women suffered job losses proportionate to those of white women. Still, their losses were far less severe than those of Hispanic men and women. Black workers already had higher unemployment rates, as has always been the case, but their unemployment rates did not skyrocket as much as other groups.