Savannah's Mayor Honor's Labor Unions

Mayor of Savannah GA forms Working Savannah partnership with Savannah Regional Central Labor Council (SRCLC) and issues Proclamation recognizing Labor's contributions.   Accepting the Proclamation is SRCLC President Christi Hulme. 

The proclamation recognizes September 3rd through September 10th, 2020 as "Labor Week"

President Hulme was also announced as Chair of Working Savannah - the partnership between the Savannah Regional CLC and the City of Savannah.

Mayor Van Johnson said, "It makes so much sense for the City of Savannah to have a strong partnership with our Labor community. And I promised this.  And since they are already very well organized, we will call this partnership with the Savannah Regional Central Labor Council - "Working Savannah".   Where we will work together to ensure better work, better pay and benefit opportunities for Savannahians through apprenticeships and job training programs that these affiliates already do so well."

President Christi Hulme stated, "On behalf of all local unions in the Savannah area, I want to thank you, Mayor Johnson and City Council for this great honor.  Recognizing the struggles and accomplishments labor unions have made which benefits all workers and the community is a tremendous statement."

To see the video visit https://youtu.be/bjYkeDszUSE

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